Tag Archive: dslr


So you have a DSLR and want to buy a new lens. Of course there are gobs of lenses out there. And a gob of manufactures that make gobs of lenses. Basically, a lot of choices.

The folks at Crisislab have experimented with the workhorse lens of the photographer (24-70mm f/2.8) and compared four brands side-by-side.

These lenses are not cheap, but they could really improve your shots. And if you are looking to upgrade your DSLR, a new lens is usually at the top of the list.

These guys do a great job of comparing the lenses not only for still photography, but also for video. Which is important because so many people are using DSLR to shoot HD video.

Spoiler: They don’t even pick the Canon or the Nikon. They choose the Tamron! The deciding factor was the Optical Stabilization on the Tamron. Spoiler 2: They destroy lenses with baseball bats!

Many venues are preparing for the Christmas season. A lot of hard work goes into producing the various plays, concerts, and cantatas that are presented this time of year. Because of all this work, it it nice to have a video of the presentation. You and I, as the volunteer tech person, are generally placed in charge of this task. So why not make this year’s video a little cooler.

Instead of using one camera to record the show, get a hold of several cameras. Borrowing cameras from friends or people in your congregation is a great way to go. Another option is to purchase a couple mini HD cameras. They are fairly inexpensive, and take full HD video.

Now, during the production, it is unlikely that you will get to run around the stage getting close ups of your instrumentalist or the view from the choir loft. However, with the mini HD cameras, you can discreetly place them around the stage to get cool shots of the piano player’s hands or close up of the timpani or a the view looking into the crowd from behind the actors.

But how will you get the cameras to stay in place? With the clip lamp camera mount, of course!

In this video, The Frugal Filmmaker shows us how to make a cheap clip-on camera mount. It looks useful for clamping small cameras in areas where a cameraman would be distracting.
 

Have fun making an awesome multi-camera Christmas concert video!

Mini shotgun mics for a DSLR
Many venues are changing over from the shoulder-mounted video cameras and the hand-held cameras to the DSLR. They are relatively inexpensive, and they take wonderful video. They’re also versatile and can be mounted to any number of tripods, rigs, and jibs. However, they don’t record very good audio.

Maybe we can’t decide which one is our favorite, but we can integrate them together by using different types of mini shotgun mics. I would love the ability to attach a small but effective mic onto a DSLR or a hand-held camera, like my Canon HV30. These mini shotgun mics would allow me to record way better audio than the on-board mic.

I’m from the Midwest, so Hurricane Sandy isn’t effecting my state weather-wise. But if I was in the rainy area, I would use this DIY camera rain guard to get some great shots of the weather.

I’m sure we’ll get our share of rain, snow and sleet later.

I have a Canon HV30. It’s a nice little handheld camera. It takes HD video and is pretty easy to work with. If you have ever used a handheld video camera, you know the “awww man” moment when you watch the video and it is all shaky, especially if you, as the cameraman, were moving around.

These guys built a DIY shoulder mount for their DSLR camera. It seemed to work great for them, and the price was right.

So I built one to use with my video camera. It worked really well. I used it at a 5K event. It was very comfortable for standing still shots, and helped to steady the camera when I moved. The best use came as I rode on the back of a 4-wheeler, facing backwards and filming the 1st place runner. That was fun.