Tag Archive: live mixing


There are so many digital mixers on the market right now. So many, that I don’t know what all I need and/or will want as soon as I figure out everything that it does.

 

I discovered the Behringer X32 and a chart comparing it to some other digital mixers.

We have had good experiences with our other Behringer products. From FullCompass.com a Behringer X32 and a digital snake is under $4000. I was pretty excited by this. From my other post, I thought I might have to spend more than $25,000!

Happy Cyber Monday! I hope everyone found some great deals online.

It seems to me that everything is going digital. And I don’t think it is just me. Small venues could only dream of a digital audio console a few years ago. Now, they are much closer (though still out of reach for some) to being a regular feature of not-so-mega churches and theaters.

I had a conversation with a fellow tech person this weekend as to what the next step should be for our sound system. Going digital was the main theme. My question was, how do we go digital?

The obvious answer is the digital audio console. And I was surprised to discover that going digital did not mean getting rid of all analog components. Instead, it meant we could move our analog equipment to a different area and use a digital board as a remote control for the system.

I can’t wait to find out about all this digital equipment.

Radio Shack amp used at camp

I am blessed to volunteer at a church with a fairly modern audio video system.We have no more jury-rigged contraptions, and the Radio Shack equipment is finally being phased out.

A couple years ago though, I worked at a camp out in Colorado. Its sound system was a stack of Radio Shack amplifiers with in-line faders, old 70’s PA speakers, and an early Shure wireless system that kinda worked. What a fun summer of troubleshooting and jury-rigging!

These tips for making the most of the outdated sound system sure would have come in handy out there at camp. I think it was a good experience for me to work with that old equipment (especially as a beginner). It gave me an appreciation for the new stuff and helped me to figure out how to troubleshoot problems. (I also realize how important those tips are.)

 

  A technical director doesn’t just know everything about the equipment. No, it is much more than that. Learning the equipment is really the first step to being a great technical director. Technical directors should work on skills besides just the technical ones. The article calls the technical director a “technical artist.” I think that is a great term for that position. Yes, the director has to lead his team, but he also must craft the presentation aesthetically.  

It is so easy to become bored or apathetic to our practice. Turn up these mics, dim this light, here we go again. But we fail to realize that each event is a new chance to impact lives whether with the morals from our play or the message of the gospel. Of course, being a creative artist takes more work, but the rewards are worth it. Remember the reason why you volunteered in the first place.

Got Good Gains?

Mixer Faders

Few tech volunteers come with amazing in-depth knowledge when they join the team. Most of them learn on the job. They are shown the basics, and then they go to work.

“Here, move this fader up and down until it sounds right.” Okay… I guess I can do that.

What is the next step to doing a better job? Learn more than doing just the basics. Let’s start with setting the gains on the mixer board. Pretty basic stuff, but it makes a big difference in how the audio sounds.

Measuring the Music Mix

I always enjoy the opportunity to mix the audio for a church service. I always like to make it sound the best I can. However, that usually means I just ask, “Does that sound okay?” and “Can I hear everything?” At this point I call it good and leave it.

I don’t think about the more specific questions to ask when mixing music. The questions might not all be applicable to your situation, but they are really helpful and more specific than vague “does it sound good?” questions.